Thursday, March 11, 2010

Wading Through My Wishlist

 

Recent additions to the Great Monstrosity that is my wishlist....

Origin by Diana Abu-Jaber
(Found at A Striped Armchair)

Abu-Jaber, who dealt with Arab-American themes in her earlier novels, Crescent and Arabian Jazz, shows her versatility in this gripping contemporary thriller. A spike in the number of local SIDS deaths piques the interest of Lena Dawson, a fingerprint specialist at a Syracuse, N.Y., forensics lab. Is it a statistical fluke or is there a killer at work? Determined to account for the dead infants, Lena joins the investigation, which stirs tantalizing memories from her dimly recollected early childhood. Despite her fragile mental state, Lena proves capable of surprising resolve. Her relationship with her protective ex-husband, her budding romance with a detective and her quest for her own lost past add psychological depth. Abu-Jaber's lovely nuanced prose conveys the chill of an upstate New York winter as well as it does Lena's drab existence before she was drawn into the mystery of the crib deaths. This enthralling puzzle will appeal to both crime fans and readers of literary fiction.


The Archer's Tale by Bernard Cromwell
(Found at Layers of Thought)

Already a best seller in England under the title Harlequin, this novel is the opening salvo of a new series by the author of the well-known Richard Sharpe books (e.g., Sharpe's Trafalgar). Set in the early 1400s at the beginning of the Hundred Years War between England and France, this novel depicts one of the most bloody and violent periods in the history of conflict between these two nations. After the theft of the treasure of Hookton, a broken lance thought to have been the weapon St. George used to slay the dragon, young Thomas, the bastard son of the village priest and a skilled longbowman, joins the English army in hopes of recovering the relic. Instead, he finds himself caught up in the invasion of France. Cornwell has crafted an extremely well-written novel, grounded in actual historic events. As in the Sharpe books, Cornwell's battle scenes are particularly memorable. This series, however, promises to be a bit meatier. More attention is paid to fascinating secondary characters and the roles they play in the political, religious, and social arenas of the time. Highly recommended.


Flow by Susan Kim
(Found at Steele on Entertainment)

Written like a sassy young women's magazine with first-person narrative and the occasional astonished exclamation point, a normally taboo topic claims attention with the surprising-and sometimes horrifying-history of cultural reactions to menstruation (Pliny believed menstrual blood was toxic to flora and fauna), feminine "hygiene," and the enticing yet under-researched future of period-free birth control methods. Sprinkled throughout with entertainingly naïve ads from each era of the 20th-century as well as many references to scientific findings, author and graphic designer Stein and Kim, a graphic novelist (Circle of Spies) and writer of the play adaptation of The Joy Luck Club, evoke a light-hearted tone about their serious subject. They cover everything from menarche to menopause, including what menstruation is (which receives an outstandingly clear explanation) plus an enlightening discussion of the pad v. tampon debate, which at bottom was a sophisticated marketing strategy.

9 comments:

SariJ said...

I heard Knight interviewed on NPR the other day. I am not sure what book he was talking about, it seemed it was set in a later time period. I found him interesting and smart. I forgot to look his work up though. Thanks to your post I am reminded that I want to read one of his books. I may try this.
Oh when to make time for all of our wish list reads!

Zibilee said...

All of these look interesting, though I admit to not knowing much about them until I saw this post. I am thinking that now my wish list is going to be growing! Thanks for putting the spotlight on these awesome books!

Amy @ Passages to the Past said...

I really need to start reading Bernard Cornwell - his books always look so good! If only there were more hours in the day, right?!

Alyce said...

I'd be really interested to see what you think of "Flow." It sounds like it has some potential.

Lisa said...

I've only heard of Flow--it's almost impossible not to have if you're on twitter! It does sound interesting.

writergal said...

Origin sounds great. I'm adding to my list.
thanks for including me in your list. Flow is a must-read for all women for sure.

April said...

These all look and sound really interesting!! They are new to me, but up have definitely piqued my interest!

softdrink said...

I've read Origin...it's a good book, and the main character is fascinating.

Kinna Reads said...

Good lists. And I have started a weekly feature of my own quite similar to yours. Thanks for the idea.

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